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Models for networks: a cross‐disciplinary science

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This article is an incomplete review of the rapidly growing research on network models. It focuses chiefly upon contributions to network science that have been made by sociologists, physicists, and statisticians. It addresses several topics in the area of dynamic network modeling, which is perhaps the most challenging area of current active research. Several issues in dynamic network modeling are discussed in the context of two applications: baboon grooming networks and growth in the Wikipedia. WIREs Comp Stat 2012, 4:13–27. doi: 10.1002/wics.184

Figure 1.

Network illustrating three different concepts of centrality.

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Figure 2.

‘Jefferson High’ romantic relationships network.15 Each circle represents a student and lines connecting students represent romantic relationships occurring within the 6 months preceding the interview. Numbers under subgraphs count the number of times that pattern was observed (e.g., there were 63 pairs that were unconnected to anyone else).

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Figure 3.

Circular lattice graph changes as the β model increases the probability of random connections.

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Figure 4.

Preferential attachment model: random and scale‐free networks.

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Figure 5.

Baboon data: representation of the baboon grooming relations at four different time periods, (December 1998 to November 1999).

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Figure 6.

Baboon data: individual locations in latent space. Plots (a)–(d) are for different time points.

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Figure 7.

Right‐hand group: individual locations in latent space. (a) Third time period and (b) fourth time period.

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Figure 8.

Left‐hand group: individual locations in latent space. (a) Third time period and (b) fourth time period.

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Figure 9.

A bar chart of the number of new articles in the topic category Statistics that were created in each year.

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Figure 10.

Connectivity and betweenness centrality for the subtopic Continuous distributions within the topic Statistics.

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Figure 11.

Articles for which ‘lambda’ as an important predictor of edges/non‐edges, and their connections to other articles in the Continuous distribution subtopic and the Statistics topic.

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Data Structures > Graph, Digraph, and Network Data
Data Structures > Social Networks
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