Home
This Title All WIREs
WIREs RSS Feed
How to cite this WIREs title:
WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol
Impact Factor: 5.681

Characterization of physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and their immediate environments in high‐throughput screening of nanomaterial biological activity

Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML PDF

Can't access this content? Tell your librarian.

Thousands of nanomaterials (NMs) are in commerce and few have toxicity data. To prioritize NMs for toxicity testing, high‐throughput screening (HTS) of biological activity may be the only practical and timely approach to provide the necessary information. As in all nanotoxicologic studies, characterization of physicochemical properties of NMs and their immediate environments in HTS is critical to understanding how these properties affect NM bioactivity and to allow extrapolation to NMs not screened. The purpose of the study, the expert‐groups‐recommended minimal characterization, and NM physicochemical properties likely to affect measured bioactivity all help determine the scope of characterization. A major obstacle in reaping the full benefits of HTS for NMs is the low throughput of NM physicochemical characterization, which may require more sample quantity than HTS assays. Increasing the throughput and speed, and decreasing the amount of NMs needed for characterization are crucial. Finding characterization techniques and biological activity assays compatible with diverse classes of NMs is a challenge and multiple approaches for the same endpoints may be necessary. Use of computational tools and nanoinformatics for organizing and analyzing data are important to fully utilize the power of HTS. Other desired advances include the ability to more fully characterize: pristine NM without prior knowledge of NM physicochemical properties; non‐pristine NMs (e.g., after use); NM in not‐perfectly‐dispersed suspension; and NM in biological samples at exposure‐relevant conditions. Through combining HTS and physicochemical characterization results, we will better understand NM bioactivities, prioritize NMs for further testing, and build computational models to predict NM toxicity. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1229

Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article.

Browse by Topic

Toxicology and Regulatory Issues in Nanomedicine > Toxicology of Nanomaterials
blog comments powered by Disqus

Access to this WIREs title is by subscription only.

Recommend to Your
Librarian Now!

The latest WIREs articles in your inbox

Sign Up for Article Alerts

In the Spotlight

James F. Leary

James F. Leary
has been contributing to nanomedical research and technologies throughout his career. Such contributions include the invention of high-speed flow cytometry, cell sorting techniques, and rare-event methods. Dr. Leary’s current research spans across three general areas in nanomedicine. The first is the development of high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry and cell sorting technologies. The second explores BioMEMS technologies. These include miniaturized cell sorters, portable devices for detection of microbial pathogens in food and water, and artificial human “organ-on-a-chip” technologies which consists of developing cell culture chips capable of simulating the activities and mechanics of entire organs and organ systems. His third area of research aims at developing smart nano-engineered systems for single-cell drug or gene delivery for nanomedicine. Dr. Leary currently holds nine issued U.S. Patents with four currently pending, and he has received NIH funding for over 25 years.

Learn More

Twitter: WIREsNanomed Follow us on Twitter