Home
This Title All WIREs
WIREs RSS Feed
How to cite this WIREs title:
WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol
Impact Factor: 6.35

Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes

Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML PDF

Can't access this content? Tell your librarian.

As an emerging class of optical nanomaterials, semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) are highly photostable, optically active and versatile in chemistry; these properties make them attractive as molecular imaging agents to enable imaging of biological events and functionalities at multiple scales. More recently, a variety of SPNs have been found to exhibit high photoacoustic properties, and further empowered photoacoustic imaging for contrast enhanced in vivo molecular imaging. Target‐sensitive components can be incorporated in the SPNs to create activatable imaging probes to sense and monitor the target dynamics in living objects. Intrinsically biophotonic and biocompatible, SPNs can be further engineered for multimodal imaging and for real‐time imaging of drug delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1418. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1418

This article is categorized under:

  • Diagnostic Tools > In Vivo Nanodiagnostics and Imaging
(a) Schematic of the tissue‐mimicking phantom containing hemoglobin and intralipid implanted with two polyethylene tubes filled with SPN1 solution (Tube 1: [SPN]= 40 μg mL −1, Tube 2: [SPN]= 20 μg mL −1). (b) PA/Ultrasound co‐registered 3D image of the tissue‐mimicking phantom. (c) Fluorescence/bright‐field overlaid top‐view image of the tissue‐mimicking phantom. (d) (d) 2D PA top‐view image of the tissue‐mimicking phantom. (e) Representative fluorescence/bright‐field overlaid image of a mouse with the SPN1‐filled PE tube implanted subcutaneously at the dorsal aspect of the leg (Red dash line indicates the location of the tube). (f) Representative ultrasound (top) and PA/ultrasound (bottom) images of the mouse leg implanted with tubes filled with the nanoparticle solution (left, [SPN]= 20 μg mL −1) or water (right), respectively. White arrows indicate the sidewalls of tubes. (Reprinted with permission from Ref. Copyright 2013 Nature Publishing Group)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Photoacoustic, photothermal and fluorescence profiles of SPN1‐4. (a) PA spectra of SPN1‐4 solutions (in 1×PBS, pH 7.4) (b) Representative PA images of SPN1‐4 solutions ([SPN]= 2 μg mL −1) excited by pulsed laser at 710 and 850 nm, respectively. (c) Photothermal properties of SPN1‐4 solutions, showing the temperature of the SPN solutions ([SPN]= 20 μg mL −1 in 1×PBS, pH 7.4) as a function of laser irradiating time. (d) Fluorescence spectra of SPN1‐4 solutions (in 1×PBS, pH 7.4). PL: photoluminescence. (e) Normalized PA and fluorescence intensities based on the same mass extinction coefficients at 710 nm of SPNs solutions. (Reprinted with permission from Ref. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Chemical structures of low bandgap semiconducting polymers used for nanoparticle formulations and photoacoustic imaging. (a)SP1 (PCPDBT), (b) SP2, (c) SP3, (d) SP4, and (e) PFTTQ.
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Simplified electronic structure of donor–acceptor co‐polymer chain with low bandgap.
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
(a) Schematics of RSPN structure and ROS sensoring mechanism. (b) PA spectra of RSPN in the absence and presence of H2O2 and ONOO. ([RSPN]= 5 μg mL −1, [ROS]= 5 μM). (c) Ratio of PA amplitude at 700 nm to that at 820 nm (PA700/PA820) of RSPN treated with various ROS ([ROS]= 5 μM). (d) Representative PA image of RAW264.7 cell pellets embedded in alga phantom with or without stimulation of LPS/INF‐γ, and with NAC protection. (e) Quantification of PA700/PA820 for cell pellets with or without stimulation of LPS/INF‐γ, and with NAC protection (n = 4, P < 0.05). (f) Real‐time in vivo PA imaging of mouse acute edema induced by Zymosan after intramuscular injection of RSPN. (g) PA700/PA820 value as a function of time post‐injection of RSPN. (Statistically significant difference started from 10‐min post‐injection, P < 0.05). (Reprinted with permission from Ref. Copyright 2013 Nature Publishing Group)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumor and LN. Representative in vivo PA imaging of mouse subcutaneous tumors pre‐injection and at 2 h after intravenous injection of SPN4, shown as maximum intensity projection image (a) and 3D reconstructed image (b). (c) Representative ultrasound (top) and PA/ultrasound co‐registered (bottom) images of the mouse lymph nodes at 24 h after intravenous injection of SPN1 (50 μg). (Reprinted with permission from Refs and . Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and 2011 Nature Publishing Group)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]

Related Articles

Nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging
Engineering multifunctional nanoparticles: all‐in‐one versus one‐for‐all
A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging

Browse by Topic

Diagnostic Tools > In Vivo Nanodiagnostics and Imaging

Access to this WIREs title is by subscription only.

Recommend to Your
Librarian Now!

The latest WIREs articles in your inbox

Sign Up for Article Alerts