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Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Water
Volume 4 Issue 6 (November/December 2017)
Page 0 - 0

Cover Image

Cover Image, Volume 4, Issue 6
Published Online: Oct 13 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1263
The cover image, by Laurent Pfister et al, is based on Advanced Review Terrestrial diatoms as tracers in catchment hydrology: a review, DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1241.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Opinions

Engaging with the politics of water governance
Published Online: Sep 11 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1245
Foregrounding questions of equity by conceptualizing water governance as distributions of water, knowledge and expertise, and voice and authority
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
The cause of rapid lake expansion in the Tibetan Plateau: climate wetting or warming?
Published Online: Aug 23 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1236
Since the late 1990s, most closed lakes in the interior TP expanded and deepened rapidly, indicating a significant change in regional hydrology. Which factor played a key role in lake expansion, climate wetting or warming? This paper reviews the process of lake dynamics in the TP during the past four decades and analyzes the contribution of the main factors that are related to lake water budget.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Overviews

Transboundary ‘hydro‐hegemony’: 10 years later
Published Online: Sep 07 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1242
Lead‐up to the hydro‐hegemony framework.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Mediterranean wetlands: archaeology, ecology, and sustainability
Published Online: Aug 16 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1238
Changing perceptions led to contrasting governance in wetlands. Car driving on a reclaimed lakebed (Polje Čepić, Croatia, 1932, author unknown).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Advanced Reviews

A review on statistical postprocessing methods for hydrometeorological ensemble forecasting
Published Online: Sep 14 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1246
Statistical postprocessors are statistical models constructed from historical observations and reforecasts. They can be applied to generate calibrated hydrometeorological ensemble forecasts for any given real‐time raw forecasts.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Quantifying components of the phosphorus cycle in temperate forests
Published Online: Sep 03 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1243
A schematic respresentation of the Phosphorus cycle in temperate forests. Pools and fluxes are scaled to their average size. See the full paper for more detailed information and data sources.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Terrestrial diatoms as tracers in catchment hydrology: a review
Published Online: Aug 30 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1241
Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) ordination using diatom species data from distinct geological units collected with ISCO samplers during rainfall events in stream water of six subcatchments of the Attert River basin (Luxembourg). Different geological bedrock units identified by distinct color codes. Each point represents a diatom species. Groups were defined using an indicator species analysis based on the subcatchments.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
The politics of water: a review of hydropolitical frameworks and their application in China
Published Online: Aug 02 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1239
The eastern route of China's South‐North Water Transfer Project.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Focus Articles

Sachet water: regulation and implications for access and equity in Accra, Ghana
Published Online: Sep 11 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1244
Sachet water delivery in Nima, Accra. Photo by Cynthia Morinville, July 2011.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
The changing water cycle: impacts of an evolving supply and demand landscape on urban water reliability in the Bay Area
Published Online: Aug 07 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1240
Changing supply and demand dynamics play an important role on water resource reliability. These sociohydrologic interactions define not only how far existing supplies can go, but also opportunities for more effective management at both local and regional scales.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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