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WIREs Water
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Water
Volume 5 Issue 1 (January/February 2018)
Page 0 - 0

Opinion

The changing water cycle: the need for an integrated assessment of the resilience to changes in water supply in High‐Mountain Asia
Published Online: Oct 24 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1258
Building resilience to changes in Asian water supply will depend on scientific knowledge, social understanding, and an appreciation of environmental history.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Overviews

Goals and principles for programmatic river restoration monitoring and evaluation: collaborative learning across multiple projects
Published Online: Oct 29 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1257
Programmatic monitoring and evaluation of river restoration projects (ProME) builds on standardised surveys and systematic cross‐project comparison. ProME allows for collaborative learning, transfer of results across restoration projects and for adaptive management and monitoring.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Key factors influencing differences in stream water quality across space
Published Online: Oct 24 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1260
Spatial differences in stream water quality are affected by a number of landscape characteristics; and the influence of these landscape characteristics can be affected by the distance from the river, cross correlations between landscape characteristics, and seasonality.
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Citizen science for hydrological risk reduction and resilience building
Published Online: Oct 24 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1262
Conceptual overview of the paper: potential opportunities of citizen science‐related concepts and technologies in the context of knowledge generation for hydrological risk reduction and resilience building.
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Green infrastructure and its catchment‐scale effects: an emerging science
Published Online: Sep 28 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1254
Visualization of the scaling effects of green infrastructure, or low‐impact development (LID) practices, on downstream waters from plot to nested catchment scales (not to scale).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Advanced Reviews

Water technology, knowledge and power. Addressing them simultaneously
Published Online: Nov 01 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1261
Water knowledge and technology shape the way water is accessed, shared and distributed. Therefore the research question is: how to address their link to power relations? Here in the photograph, groundwater irrigation in South India
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
More than just snowmelt: integrated watershed science for changing climate and permafrost at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory
Published Online: Oct 24 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1255
Research at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO) focuses on advancing knowledge about how climate and permafrost change affect water.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
A tale of Mexico's most exploited—and connected—watersheds: the Basin of Mexico and the Lerma‐Chapala Basin
Published Online: Sep 28 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1247
Location of the Lerma‐Chapala Basin and the Basin of Mexico, highlighting their main urban areas. The Basin of Mexico is home to Mexico's largest city: Mexico City and its Metropolitan Area (MCMA) with approximately 20 million inhabitants. The Lerma‐Chapala basin represents the main water source for Mexico's second largest city: Guadalajara, with nearly 4.5 million inhabitants, is also a water source for the MCMA, as water extracted from the upper Lerma basin ‐through the Cutzamala and Lerma water supply systems ‐provides nearly 30% of Mexico City's water supply. Other important cities within the Lerma‐Chapala basin are Toluca, Querétaro, León, Irapuato, Celaya and Salamanca.
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Focus Articles

Potential pollution risks of historic landfills on low‐lying coasts and estuaries
Published Online: Nov 16 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1264
This paper highlights historic landfills in low‐lying estuarine and coastal locations (historic coastal landfills) as potential sources of diffuse pollution. It reviews what is known about contaminants in the landfills, and considers contaminant pathways and likely receptors. It identifies significant gaps in knowledge and a need for further research.
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Understanding dissolved organic matter dynamics in urban catchments: insights from in situ fluorescence sensor technology
Published Online: Oct 17 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1259
Conceptual representation of dissolved organic matter dynamics during high‐flow events in headwater urban catchments. CSO, combined sewerage overflow; MW, molecular weight; PAH, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; WwTW, waste water treatment works. Size of arrows are proportional to the magnitude of the flux.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Learning from ancient water management: Archeology's role in modern‐day climate change adaptations
Published Online: Oct 15 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1256
Location and schematic layout of the water management techniques mentioned in the text.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
How is a bottled water market created?
Published Online: May 02 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1220
Tap water advertising from the Syndicat des Eaux d'Île‐de‐France. (Reprinted with permission for Ref. 57. Copyright 2005 Sircome.)
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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