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WIREs Water
Impact Factor: 3.943
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Water
Volume 5 Issue 2 (March/April 2018)
Page 0 - 0

Cover Image

Cover Image, Volume 5, Issue 2
Published Online: Feb 16 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1284
The cover image, by Karsten Paerregaard, is based on the Focus Article Power in/of/as water: Revisiting the hydrologic cycle in the Peruvian Andes, DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1270.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Opinion

Evolutionary leap in large‐scale flood risk assessment needed
Published Online: Dec 29 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1266
Evolutionary leap in flood risk assessment methodologies is needed to reliably quantify real large‐scale risk used to inform national and river basin policies worldwide. On June 2013, large‐scale flood happened in the Elbe basin, Germany. The City of Grimma (Photo: André Künzelmann).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Primers

Ecosystem engineers in rivers: An introduction to how and where organisms create positive biogeomorphic feedbacks
Published Online: Dec 28 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1271
Different ecosystem engineers in rivers create positive biogeomorphic feedbacks in different geomorphic environments. Diagrams show approximate context in which ecosystem engineers actively engineer by causing positive biogeomorphic feedbacks, based on three geomorphic factors: relative stability, channel width, and grain size.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Microplastics: An introduction to environmental transport processes
Published Online: Dec 28 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1268
Conceptual model representing the ‘Plastic Cycle’ concept.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Overview

Refining and defining riverscape genetics: How rivers influence population genetic structure
Published Online: Jan 31 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1269
Explicitly considering how the spatial distribution of freshwater habitats influences fine‐scale genetic structure may enhance our understanding of the demographic and evolutionary consequences of habitat loss, fragmentation, or restoration.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Advanced Reviews

Liquid futures: Water management systems and anticipated environments
Published Online: Jan 09 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1274
A dried reservoir bed, emblematic of concerns about water scarcity and one of many anticipated environmental futures that shape water management systems across the globe. (Photo by Sayd Randle).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Produced water, money water, living water: Anthropological perspectives on water and fracking
Published Online: Dec 28 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1272
Only aerial views can illustrate the scale of connected unconventional gas wells and associated water infrastructure. © Google 2017.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
How landscape organization and scale shape catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry: insights from a long‐term catchment study
Published Online: Nov 22 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1265
In this work we synthesize 30 years of hydrological and biogeochemical research from the Krycklan catchment study (KCS) in northern Sweden to demonstrate the benefits of coupling long‐term monitoring with multiscale research to advance our understanding of catchment functioning across space and time. We show that the regulation of hydrological and biogeochemical patterns can be decomposed into four, hierarchically structured landscape features that include: (1) the transmissivity and reactivity of dominant source layers within riparian soils, (2) the spatial arrangement of groundwater input zones that govern water and solute fluxes at reach—to segment—scales, (3) sub‐catchment heterogeneity (forests, mires, and lakes) that generates unique biogeochemical signals downstream, and (4) broad‐scale mixing of surface streams with deep groundwater contributions.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Focus Articles

Hydropower and high productivity in the Hanford Reach: A synthesis of how flow management may benefit fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River, USA
Published Online: Feb 02 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1275
Chinook salmon redd surveys on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Near the end of the spawning period, river flows are temporarily reduced to allow biologists to determine the elevation of redds. Using these data, flows are managed to ensure the vast majority of redds remain underwater until juveniles emerge from the gravel. Photograph by Aaron Nepean, Cutboard Studios.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Unexpected ecological advances made possible by long‐term data: A Coweeta example
Published Online: Jan 09 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1273
The joint long‐term response of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and annual streamflow in response to clearcut harvest and natural regeneration of Coweeta Watershed 7 relative to a reference watershed shows interactions with forest succession and climate cycles but no return to initial conditions after 40 years.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Power in/of/as water: Revisiting the hydrologic cycle in the Peruvian Andes
Published Online: Dec 29 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1270
Mount Hualca Hualca of Cabanaconde.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Form and function relationships revealed by long‐term research in a semiarid mountain catchment
Published Online: Dec 22 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1267
Catchment form is intimately connected to function in the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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