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WIREs Cogn Sci
Impact Factor: 2.881

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Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Cognitive Science
Volume 10 Issue 1 (January/February 2019)
Page 0 - 0

Advanced Reviews

Decoding the neural representation of self and person knowledge with multivariate pattern analysis and data‐driven approaches
Published Online: Sep 26 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1482
Review of recent multivariate pattern analysis and data‐driven approaches to decoding and characterizing the brain's representation of self and person knowledge.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Variation, race, and multiracial identity in linguistic research
Published Online: Aug 06 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1480
Spectrogram of the phrase “to keep doing that” from one speaker in Holliday (NaN) illustrating H* and L + H* pitch accents. The first pitch accent, labeled H*, is characterized by a simple rise, and the second one, labeled L + H*.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Clarifying cognitive control and the controllable connectome
Published Online: Jul 03 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1471
How can we carefully integrate cognitive control and systems engineering research for basic discovery and translation?
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Focus Articles

How can transcranial magnetic stimulation be used to causally manipulate memory representations in the human brain?
Published Online: Jun 27 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1469
Brain imaging, brain stimulation, and data analytic techniques employing artificial intelligence (machine learning algorithms), are being combined to reveal new insights about the mind and brain, particularly with regards to the way in which information is retained in memory or lost from memory.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Brain (re)organization following visual loss
Published Online: Jun 07 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1468
Illustration of the dissociation between anatomical changes that are direct result of sensory deprivation and consequent atrophy and those related to compensatory reorganization and behavioral adaptations. The left panel illustrates brain areas where the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR; a proxy for myelin content) is significantly more elevated in the early blind relative to sighted controls (EARLY ‐ SIGHTED), whereas the center panel illustrates brain areas where the MTR is significantly reduced in the early blind (SIGHTED ‐ EARLY). The right panel illustrates brain areas where MTR was found to significantly correlate with performance on an auditory discrimination task; note the correspondence between the regions highlighted in the left and right panels, demonstrating the adaptive and compensatory nature of the change in myelin (adapted with permission from Voss et al., 2014).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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