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WIREs Dev Biol
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Current Issue

Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Developmental Biology
Volume 7 Issue 5 (September/October 2018)
Page 0 - 0

Cover Image

Cover Image, Volume 7, Issue 5
Published Online: Aug 16 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wdev.334
The cover image, by Crystal D. Rogers and Shuyi Nie, is based on the Advanced Review Specifying neural crest cells: From chromatin to morphogens and factors in between, DOI: 10.1002/wdev.322.
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Overview

What is a stem cell?
Published Online: May 15 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wdev.323
A consensus diagram showing stem cell behavior. The stem cell exists in a specific niche which enables it to undergo self‐renewing divisions. It also generates differentiated cells via a population of committed but still dividing transit‐amplifying cells. Not all stem cell types generate multiple types of differentiated cell.
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Advanced Review

Specifying neural crest cells: From chromatin to morphogens and factors in between
Published Online: May 03 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wdev.322
Schematic of the multiple stages of neural crest (NC) development in avian embryos. Images are sections representing premigratory and migratory NC cells in orange. At all stages, epidermis is labeled in pink and lies lateral and dorsal to the closing/closed neural tube. The neural plate is marked in pink and green alone (neural plate border panel), and both pink and green with orange premigratory NC cells (premigratory and migratory NC panels). On the right side, the five different types of NC cells are listed from anterior to posterior (cranial, cardiac, vagal, trunk, and sacral) and their putative derivatives are listed below as summarized in a recent review.
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Focus Article

Wound‐induced cell proliferation during animal regeneration
Published Online: May 02 2018
DOI: 10.1002/wdev.321
Many animals respond to injury with an increase in the level of cell proliferation, that is, they display injury‐induced hyper‐proliferation (IIHP). This review considers the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying IIHP during regeneration in distantly related animals to assess the evolution of these pathways. This phylogenetic tree shows relationships of the major animal groups discussed. Red bidirectional arrows indicate plane of amputation; unidirectional red arrow indicates site of injury.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF