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WIREs RNA
Impact Factor: 4.838
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
RNA
Volume 9 Issue 1 (January/February 2018)
Page 0 - 0

Cover Image

Cover Image, Volume 9, Issue 1
Published Online: Dec 21 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1464
The cover image, by Dierk Niessing et al., is based on the Focus Article mRNA transport in fungal top models, DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1453. Image Credit: CEPLAS ‐ Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Opinion

Advances and challenges in the detection of transcriptome‐wide protein– RNA interactions
Published Online: Aug 29 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1436
Methods to capture protein‐RNA interactions. Different techniques are required to capture single‐stranded (green), double‐stranded (blue), and indirect (yellow) RNA interactions. Crosses (X) in red mark RNA sites that are crosslinked to the RNA binding protein. (right) UV treatment at 254 nm preferentially captures binding in single‐stranded regions. (bottom right) 0.1% formaldehyde treatment captures all protein‐protein and protein‐RNA interactions. (bottom left) RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) uses a native pulldown (no crosslinking) to capture binding events with antibody selection. Optimized RNA digestion conditions can reveal specific binding sites with RIP. (left) Photoactivatable ribonucleoside analog treatment (PAR) increases UV crosslinking efficiency at 365 nm. (top left) Methylene blue intercalates between the bases of double‐stranded RNA to allow crosslinking in double‐stranded regions in the presence of visible light. (top right) Protein‐RNA interaction sites are marked by exogenous RNA modifications. This requires creating a fusion protein to modify RNA near binding sites with biotinylation (BioTag‐BirA) or A‐to‐I RNA editing (ADAR).
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Overview

Cyclic‐di‐GMP regulation of virulence in bacterial pathogens
Published Online: Oct 08 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1454
Cyclic‐di‐GMP is a widely used signaling molecule that binds receptors to regulate phenotypes that can have an impact on the bacterial virulence in mammalian hosts.
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Advanced Reviews

RNA versatility, flexibility, and thermostability for practice in RNA nanotechnology and biomedical applications
Published Online: Nov 03 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1452
The 3WJ motif derived from the packaging RNA of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is highly thermodynamically stable. The 3WJ can be tuned to construct RNA triangles and squares. Through intermolecular interaction RNA hexamer can be constructed. The RNA triangular units can be further assembled into RNA 2D triangle, square, pentamer, hexamer, and arrays as well as 3D structures including tetrahedron, prism, and dendrimers. The multifunctional RNA nanoparticles have shown enormous potential as delivery vehicles for targeted cancer therapy.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
RNA uridylation: a key posttranscriptional modification shaping the coding and noncoding transcriptome
Published Online: Oct 05 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1440
Uridylation is a widespread and potent posttranscriptional modification affecting the fate of coding and noncoding RNAs in eukaryotes.
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Rules and tools to predict the splicing effects of exonic and intronic mutations
Published Online: Sep 26 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1451
Representative rules (red) and tools (blue) to predict the splicing effects of exonic and intronic mutations. Ex, exonic position; Int, intronic position.
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Endonuclease Regnase‐1/ Monocyte chemotactic protein‐1‐induced protein‐1 (MCPIP1 ) in controlling immune responses and beyond
Published Online: Sep 20 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1449
Regnase‐1/MCPIP1 is an endoribonuclease that degrades a set of mRNAs in a translation dependent manner by interacting with UPF1. Regnase‐1 recognizes mRNAs harboring a stem‐loop structure in the 3' untranslated region, and regulates various biological processes such as innate and adaptive immunity, as well as development, cancer and metabolism.
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Focus Articles

Posttranscriptional control of airway inflammation
Published Online: Oct 26 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1455
Posttranscriptional regulation of chemokines CCL2 and CCL7.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
mRNA transport in fungal top models
Published Online: Oct 10 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1453
Eukaryotic microorganisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae (left) and Ustilago maydis (right) serve as role models to study actin‐ or microtubule‐dependent mRNA transport, respectively.
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Ancient and modern: hints of a core post‐transcriptional network driving chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
Published Online: Aug 01 2017
DOI: 10.1002/wrna.1432
(a)–(c) RNA‐binding proteins influence epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression through complex networks with mRNAs, noncoding RNAs, and other proteins. (a) RNA‐binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) regulates platinum sensitivity and patient survival through regulation of mRNAs involved in apoptosis and the stress response. (b) HuR exerts an oncogenic effect through stabilization and therefore increased translation of a range of mRNAs. (c) RNA‐binding proteins, such as YB1, LARP1, and IMP1 may converge on multiple subsets of mRNAs and signaling pathways as part of a network that drives progression of EOC and/or resistance to chemotherapy.
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