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WIREs Energy Environ.
Impact Factor: 3.297

Experimental processing of seaweeds for biofuels

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The following paper provides an overview of the potential uses of seaweeds derived both from artificial cultivation as well as from eutrophic reservoirs as the feedstock for biofuels production. This review presents biochemical (anaerobic digestion [AD] and fermentation), chemical (extraction and transesterification) and thermochemical conversions (combustion, liquefaction, gasification and pyrolysis) of seaweeds for biofuels with special attention being paid to seaweeds processing such as pretreatment techniques, production methods and experimental conditions, and so forth. Seaweeds are considered as a suitable source for biogas and bioethanol production due to their high carbohydrate content. This review explores also the possibility of the application of oil extracted from seaweeds for biodiesel production. Since the chemical composition of seaweeds significantly differs from land biomass, a new comprehensive approach is required. Many macroalgal components are recalcitrant to bioconversion and pose microbiological challenges. The text deals with advantages and disadvantages of seaweeds as a feedstock for biofuels. Since macroalgae exploitation only for energy production is too expensive, seaweed integrated biorefineries were proposed as a solution which enables a development of high‐value algal bioproducts. Algae appear to be a promising source of biofuels. Utilization of waste algal biomass constitutes a link between the pollution abatement and energy production. This article is categorized under: Bioenergy > Science and Materials
Technologies converting algal biomass to biofuels
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