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WIREs Energy Environ.
Impact Factor: 3.297

Fuel cells and their components based on microsystem technology

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This paper briefly reviews a variety of microdevices for miniaturized fuel‐cell applications. Research and development in this field have been activated since late 1990s, when portable information devices, for example, laptop computers and cellular phones, were getting popular, but battery life was quite limited. To date, different types of micro‐fuel cell, micro‐fuel reformers, fuel handling microfluidic devices, and so on were developed, and some of them were installed and used in prototyped miniaturized fuel‐cell systems. In this paper, selected examples are introduced, and problems/challenges as well as achievements are summarized. This article is categorized under: Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Science and Materials Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Systems and Infrastructure
System diagram of a passive DMFC.
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Miniature DMFC prototype using the MEMS‐based microvalve shown in Figure (Panasonic Electric Works and Tohoku University).
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Micro SOFC with an ALD YSZ ultrathin electrolyte membrane (Stanford University); (a)–(c): Top side of the YSZ membrane, (d)–(f): Bottom side of the YSZ membrane. (Reproduced with permission from Ref 70. Copyright 2008, American Chemical Society.)
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Multicell connection methods.
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Typical schematic structures of micro‐fuel cell.
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Micro‐fuel reformer (Tohoku University and Panasonic Electric Works).
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Micro‐fuel reformer (Casio Computer). (Reproduced with permission from Ref 45. Copyright 2009, JSME.)
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Edge‐reflection‐type Lamb wave methanol concentration sensor (Tohoku University).
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Three typical acoustic devices for methanol concentration sensing.
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Coriolis flow/density sensor (Integrated Sensing Systems). (Reproduced with permission from Ref 21. Copyright 2004, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society.)
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Microejector pump for a micro‐fuel reformer (Tohoku University).
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Passive carbon dioxide degassing microchannel (University of Freiburg, IMTEK). (Reproduced with permission from Ref 11. Copyright 2006, IOP publishing Limited.)
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Electrostatically actuated microvalve (Panasonic Electric Works and Tohoku University).
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Schematic structure of a micro hydrogen pressure regulator (Canon and The University of Tokyo). Reproduced with permission from Ref 8. Copyright 2006, IOP publishing Limited.
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System diagram of a reforming‐type fuel cell.
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System diagram of an active DMFC.
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Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Science and Materials
Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Systems and Infrastructure

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