Home
This Title All WIREs
WIREs RSS Feed
How to cite this WIREs title:
WIREs Energy Environ.
Impact Factor: 3.297

Solid oxide fuel cells for power generation

Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML PDF

Can't access this content? Tell your librarian.

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), based on an oxide ion conducting electrolyte, offer a clean, low‐pollution technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. These fuel cells provide many advantages over traditional energy conversion systems including high efficiency, reliability, modularity, fuel adaptability, and very low levels of SOx and NOx emissions. Quiet, vibration‐free operation of SOFCs also eliminates noise usually associated with conventional power generation systems. Furthermore, because of their high operation temperature (600–1000°C), some hydrocarbon fuels such as natural gas can be reformed within the cell stack eliminating the need for an expensive, external reformer. In spite of these advantages, the degree and extent of their market penetration really depends on the ability to reduce the cost of SOFC‐based power systems while ensuring their long‐term durability. This article reviews the cell and stack materials, cell designs, and present commercial status of power systems built using SOFCs. This article is categorized under: Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Science and Materials Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Systems and Infrastructure
Operating principle of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013 Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Delphi's solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU) mounted underneath a Peterbilt's truck cabin. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Basic building blocks of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU). (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013, Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Ultra Electronics AMI's 250–300 W solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems. (Reproduced with permission of Ultra Electronics, AMI)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Five 100 kW size solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems installed at eBay Headquarters. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2012, Bloom Energy Corporation)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 200 kW class pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)/gas turbine hybrid system. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Versa Power Systems' 20 kW size solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Siemens/Westinghouse 200 kW pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)/microgas turbine hybrid power system. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2011, Elsevier)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Siemens Westinghouse's 100 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cogeneration system. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2011, Elsevier)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Kyocera's flat tube segmented‐in‐series cell stack for use by Tokyo Gas in producing residential combined heat and power (CHP) units. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
A 700 W solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) unit (left: SOFC system; right: hot water tank) utilizing Kyocera's anode‐supported flat tubular cells. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Kyocera's anode‐supported flat tubular cell utilized by Osaka Gas and Nippon Oil for residential combined heat and power (CHP) units. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Hexis 1 kW combined heat and power (CHP) system, Galileo 1000N. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Topsoe Fuel Cell's solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. (Figure courtesy of Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S, Denmark)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Ceramic Fuel Cell Ltd. BlueGen unit. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Ceres Power's wall‐mountable 1 kW combined heat and power (CHP) unit. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Hexis planar solid oxide fuel cell. (Reproduced from Ref  by permission of ECS—The Electrochemical Society)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Voltage–current density and power–current density plots of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013 Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Tubular solid oxide fuel cell design. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013 Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Electrochemical performance of an optimized anode‐supported single cell measured at 600, 700, and 800°C. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2005, Elsevier)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Planar solid oxide fuel cell design. (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013 Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]
Conductivity as a function of temperature for yttrium‐stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), gadolinium‐doped CeO2, and (La,Sr)(Mg,Ga)O3 (LSMG). (Reproduced from Ref . Copyright 2013 Springer‐Verlag)
[ Normal View | Magnified View ]

Browse by Topic

Fuel Cells and Hydrogen
Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Science and Materials
Fuel Cells and Hydrogen > Systems and Infrastructure

Access to this WIREs title is by subscription only.

Recommend to Your
Librarian Now!

The latest WIREs articles in your inbox

Sign Up for Article Alerts