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WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol
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Advances in engineering local drug delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy

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Abstract Cancer immunotherapy aims to leverage the immune system to suppress the growth of tumors and to inhibit metastasis. The recent promising clinical outcomes associated with cancer immunotherapy have prompted research and development efforts towards enhancing the efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade, cancer vaccines, cytokine therapy, and adoptive T cell therapy. Advancements in biomaterials, nanomedicine, and micro‐/nano‐technology have facilitated the development of enhanced local delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy, which can enhance treatment efficacy while minimizing toxicity. Furthermore, locally administered cancer therapies that combine immunotherapy with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or phototherapy have the potential to achieve synergistic antitumor effects. Herein, the latest studies on local delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy are surveyed, with an emphasis on the therapeutic benefits associated with the design of biomaterials and nanomedicines. This article is categorized under: Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Nanoscale Systems in Biology Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Nanomedicine for Oncologic Disease
The schematic for the microneedle patch enabled cold atmospheric plasma‐mediated immune checkpoint blockade. Source: Chen et al. (). Copyright 2020, National Academy of Sciences
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The schematic showing the delivery of PD‐1 blockade using nanoparticles released from a microneedle patch for melanoma treatment. Source: Wang et al. (). Copyright 2016, American Chemical Society
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Recent advances in local delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy show promise for enhancing therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity
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The schematic showing the mechanism for PLGA‐[email protected] nanoparticle assisted radiotherapy. Source: Chen et al. (2019). Copyright 2019, John Wiley & Sons, Inc
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The schematic showing the delivery of IR‐7‐loaded liposomes coated with hyaluronic acid‐CpG for local photothermal immunotherapy. Source: Li et al. () under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY‐NC) license
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The panel describing the properties of the nanofluidic drug‐eluting seed. Source: Chua et al. (). Copyright 2018, Elsevier B.V
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The schematic showing the local delivery of PD‐L1 blockade therapy and the IDO inhibitor, D‐1MT, using a bioresponsive hydrogel. Source: Yu et al. (). Copyright 2018, John Wiley & Sons, Inc
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The schematic of the in situ formed fibrin gel containing aCD47‐loaded nanoparticles. Source: Qian Chen, Chao Wang, et al. (2019). Copyright 2018, Springer Nature
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Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Nanomedicine for Oncologic Disease
Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Nanoscale Systems in Biology

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