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WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol
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Engineered nanomedicines for tumor vasculature blockade therapy

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Abstract Tumor vasculature blockade therapy (TVBT), including angiogenesis inhibition, vascular disruption, and vascular infarction, provides a promising treatment modality for solid tumors. However, low selectivity, drug resistance, and possible severe side effects have limited the clinical transformation of TVBT. Engineered nanoparticles offer potential solutions, including prolonged circulation time, targeted transportation, and controlled release of TVBT agents. Moreover, engineered nanomedicines provide a promising combination platform of TVBT with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy, ultrasound therapy, and gene therapy. In this article, we offer a comprehensive summary of the current progress of engineered nanomedicines for TVBT and also discuss current deficiencies and future directions for TVBT development. This article is categorized under: Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Nanomedicine for Oncologic Disease Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Emerging Technologies
Magnetic targeting nanoparticle for vascular infarction therapy (Zou et al., 2020). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform construction and its actions in vivo. (b) Magnetic targeting ability of nanoplatform monitored by in vivo imaging system. (c) Pictures of mice at the end of treatment
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US‐triggered “thrombus constructor” for vascular infarction therapy (Shao et al., 2019). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform actions in vivo. (b) Changes of magnetic resonance imaging and US signals in tumors and brains of mice with different treatments. (c) Tumor growth in mice belonging to different treatment groups. Data are represented as mean ± SD (n = 6). Reprinted with permission from Shao et al. (2019). Copyright 2019, Elsevier B.V
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Thermo‐sensitive hydrogel for sequential delivery of CA4 and DOX in combination therapy of chemotherapy and vascular destruction (Wei et al., 2017). (a) Schematic illustration for preparation of drug delivery nanoplatform and its actions in tumor area. (b) Cumulative release of DOX and CA4 from hydrogel in vitro. (c) Tumor growth curves of different treatment groups. Data are represented as mean ± SD (n = 6; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001). Reprinted with permission from Wei et al. (2017). Copyright 2017, Elsevier Ltd
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Spatiotemporally targeted nanoplatform for delivery of CA4P and BTZ to inhibit tumor growth and drug resistance (J. Chen et al., 2020). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform actions in tumor area. (b) Tumor growth curves of different treatment groups. Data are represented as mean ± SD (standard deviation; n = 6; ***p < 0.001). (c) Relative levels of proteasome in different treatment groups. Data are represented as mean ± SD (n = 3; ***p < 0.001). (d) Expression of CD31 detected by immunofluorescence and H&E images of tumor sections in different treatment groups. Reprinted with permission from J. Chen et al. (2020). Copyright 2020, American Chemical Society
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Lipid‐polyaniline participated in photothermal and anti‐angiogenic combination therapy (J. Wang et al., 2016). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform construction and its functions. (b) Photothermal images of mice under NIR ray. (c) Fluorescence images of anti‐angiogenic effects of different treatment groups. Reprinted with permission from J. Wang et al. (2016). Copyright 2016, Elsevier B.V
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Liposome‐participated angiogenesis inhibition therapy and gene therapy are used in combination (Sun et al., 2017). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform construction and its actions in tumor cells. (b) Distribution of nanomedicine in vivo and in isolated organs. Reprinted with permission from Sun et al. (2017). Copyright 2017, The Royal Society of Chemistry
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Nanoparticles that co‐delivered VEGF and Bcl‐2 siRNA were applied as an angiogenesis inhibition strategy (Lee et al., 2015). (a) Schematic illustration of nanoplatform construction. (b) Photos of tumor blood vessels treated with different nanoparticles. Reprinted with permission from Lee et al. (2015). Copyright 2015, Elsevier B.V
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Engineered nanomedicines for TVBT: Angiogenesis inhibition, vascular disruption, and vascular infarction therapy strategies, as well as therapeutic targets
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Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Emerging Technologies
Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Nanomedicine for Oncologic Disease

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