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Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Water
Volume 6 Issue 6 (November 2019)
Page 0 - 0

Opinion

Water resilience lessons from Cape Town's water crisis
Published Online: Aug 04 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1376
During the 2017/2018 water crisis, city‐wide water conservation targets forced Cape Town's residents to limit their use to 50 L of water per day. Photo courtesy: Lucy Rodina.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Overviews

Ecosystem engineers: Biofilms and the ontogeny of glacier floodplain ecosystems
Published Online: Oct 23 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1390
In streams, biofilms should be depicted as ecosystem engineers as they stabilize and fertilize sediments. Their development is thus critical for river ecosystems, particularly in glacier floodplains, where sediments tend to be unstable and nutrient‐limited.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Cost–benefit analysis of flood‐zoning policies: A review of current practice
Published Online: Oct 09 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1387
An example of a zoning policy whereby development has been focused onto flood safe areas combined with land‐use changes.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
How dark is a river? Artificial light at night in aquatic systems and the need for comprehensive night‐time light measurements
Published Online: Sep 30 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1388
Artificial light at night can occur as a form of environmental pollution, light pollution, which also affects aquatic systems. We identify a knowledge gap of insufficient data regarding the status quo of aquatic light pollution and provide a route to fill this gap with in‐situ measurements.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
The power to define resilience in social–hydrological systems: Toward a power‐sensitive resilience framework
Published Online: Sep 09 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1377
Power‐sensitive resilience of social–hydrological systems: five definitional questions with political implications derived from critiques of the resilience concept.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Are catchments leaky?
Published Online: Sep 04 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1386
Catchments are leaky units perched on a larger, regional hydrogeological system.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Advanced Reviews

Representing natural and artificial in‐channel large wood in numerical hydraulic and hydrological models
Published Online: Oct 23 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1389
Large wood (LW) in rivers can provide a range of benefits. This includes improving the ecological integrity of rivers, reducing flood risk and managing sediment. Numerical hydraulic and hydrological models are used to predict the effects of LW. However, the suitability of approaches to LW modeling and therefore guidance, remain uncertain.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Understanding rivers and their social relations: A critical step to advance environmental water management
Published Online: Sep 04 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1381
For many human populations around the world, river flows are linked to livelihood, identity, sense of place, religious beliefs and ceremonies, language systems, or educational practices. These embedded, reciprocal, and constitutive relationships between humans and rivers remain poorly understood, but can be critically important to assessment and implementation of environmental flows
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
A macroeconomics‐inspired interpretation of the terrestrial water cycle
Published Online: Sep 04 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1380
The connection between the weakening intensity of the terrestrial water cycle and the notion of human well‐being as a declining asset.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
How demographic developments determine the management of hydrometeorological hazard risks in rural communities: The linkages between demographic and natural hazards research
Published Online: Sep 01 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1378
Following Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, residents of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, especially children and older people, are brought to an elevated bridge area by boat (photograph by Win Henderson: Available at: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FEMA_-_14535_-_Photograph_by_Win_Henderson_taken_on_08-31-2005_in_Louisiana.jpg (accessed at May 9, 2019).).
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Regulations to protect groundwater resources during unconventional oil and gas extraction using fracking
Published Online: Sep 01 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1382
Proposed regulatory framework to protect groundwater resources during UOG extraction
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Focus Articles

Drones, hydraulics, and climate change: Inferring barriers to steelhead spawning migrations
Published Online: Oct 23 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1379
Velocity is a dynamic and highly localized component of river discharge. Areas of intense velocity can create barriers to migration for fish. But, understanding relations between river discharge and the biological implications of local hydraulic barriers has only recently become possible. High resolution digital elevation models derived from drones are useful in characterizing these hydraulic features at the scale at which migrating fish experience them. Below is a an orthorphoto mosaic of study reach overlaid with modeled velocity (m/s) at survey discharge.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Understanding institutions for water allocation and exchange: Insights from dynamic agent‐based modeling
Published Online: Aug 27 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1384
Simulation modeling of nonmarket water exchanges: Exchange strategies reach different stable arrangements depending on the population of partners.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
The small, the big, and the beautiful: Emerging challenges and opportunities for waste stabilization ponds in Australia
Published Online: Aug 22 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1383
Sixty percent of Australia's wastewater treatment plants use waste stabilization pond (WSP) technology for treatment. WSP systems are most commonly used in regional and remote areas.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
How water quality standards for pesticides affect the classification of the chemical status of rivers
Published Online: Aug 13 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1375
A suggestion for 38 new water quality criteria for pesticides led us to analyze their impacts on the classification of the chemical status of a river in a Swiss canton. We discuss revision of the standards and recommend them as long as ecosystem protection is guaranteed and demonstrated.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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