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WIREs Water
Impact Factor: 4.451
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
WIREs Water
Volume 7 Issue 3 (May 2020)
Page 0 - 0

Cover Images

Cover Image, Volume 7, Issue 3
Published Online: Apr 28 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1447
The back cover image is based on the Overview A review of freely accessible global datasets for the study of floods, droughts and their interactions with human societies, by Sara Lindersson et al., https://doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1424 Supported by: Nightlight data from NASA Black Marble 2012 and 2016. Flood hazard data from JRC Flood Hazard Map of the World, 100-year return period (Dottori et al., 2016).
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Cover Image, Volume 7, Issue 3
Published Online: Apr 28 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1446
The front cover image is based on the Advanced Review Nature‐based solutions for urban pluvial flood risk management by Zhan Tian et al., https://doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1421
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Overviews

Zero or not? Causes and consequences of zero‐flow stream gage readings
Published Online: Apr 13 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1436
Common scenarios of zero‐flow readings at gages that may be misinterpreted without stream conditions or network‐scale context. Many of these scenarios have distinct natural and anthropogenic drivers as well as implications for local and network‐scale stream ecosystems and hydrology.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Ensemble flood forecasting: Current status and future opportunities
Published Online: Mar 29 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1432
Origins of reviewed ensemble flood forecasting studies.
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Quantifying resilience in hydraulic engineering: Floods, flood records, and resilience in urban areas
Published Online: Mar 29 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1431
Resiliencein flood risk management is embedded in the emergency management life cycle. The flood incident is accompanied by operational measures of flood protection (response) and followed by a recovery phase inwhich the bounce back will hopefully take place or is organized by suitable measures. A mitigation/adaption/adjustment period can help to establish more resistance and more resilience. In long periods between flood events, it is necessary butnot easy (declining line in Fig. 6) due to several reasons (money, memory, other upcoming priorities), to maintain the same qualified level of preparedness and awareness to ensure that measures can cope with the next unexpected extraordinary flood. Resiliencein flood risk management is embedded in the emergency management life cycle. The flood incident is accompanied by operational measures of flood protection (response) and followed by a recovery phase in which the bounce back will hopefully take place or is organized by suitable measures. A mitigation/adaption/adjustment period can help to establish more resistance and more resilience. In long periods between flood events, it is necessary but not easy (declining line in Fig. 6) due to several reasons (money, memory, other upcoming priorities), to maintain the same qualified level of preparedness and awareness to ensure that measures can cope with the next unexpected extraordinary flood.
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Making Europe go from bottles to the tap: Political and societal attempts to induce behavioral change
Published Online: Mar 23 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1435
The European Commission and national initiatives (Actors) target access to tap water as well as its quality and benefits (Strategies), with a view to inducing more individuals to drink it (Goal). We assess the promise of these three strategies for stimulating behavioral changes by reviewing the pertinent strands of research.
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Assessing the state of research data publication in hydrology: A perspective from the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Incorporated
Published Online: Mar 12 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1422
Depiction of an actual workflow from the HydroShare data and model repository demonstrating new capabilities for collaborative data publication that have been shaped by multiple years of experience in providing data publication services for the hydrology community.
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The behavioral turn in flood risk management, its assumptions and potential implications
Published Online: Mar 09 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1418
Intellectual catchments engaging with the assumptions of the behavioral turn in FRM.
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A review of freely accessible global datasets for the study of floods, droughts and their interactions with human societies
Published Online: Mar 06 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1424
We review global and free geospatial datasets to support the study of floods, droughts and their interactions with human societies. We also discuss challenges for using the data in comparative water disaster research.
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Catchment systems engineering: An holistic approach to catchment management
Published Online: Feb 17 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1417
Catchment systems engineering: Integrated holistic catchment management using nature‐based solutions alongside traditional engineering structures.
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Advanced Reviews

Socio‐environmental confounders of safe water interventions
Published Online: Apr 01 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1438
Households without an in‐home water supply often face complicated choices over where to obtain their water. These decisions can be shaped by social pressures, economic realities, health considerations, topographic and environmental factors, as well as structural factors. All of these issues can confound safe water interventions if they result in households not necessarily using the safest, nearest, or least expensive water source.
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Nature‐based solutions for urban pluvial flood risk management
Published Online: Mar 12 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1421
NBS infrastructures, as the components of the ecosystem, can influence the hydrological processes and benefit stormwater management through changing ecological elements after implementation.
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Water law and climate change in the United States: A review of the legal scholarship
Published Online: Mar 10 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1423
Climate change is altering precipitation and water resources in the United States, necessitating a more adaptive response in water law. Source: https://pixabay.com/illustrations/climate-change-global-warming-2063240/
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Focus Articles

Solar desalination: Cases, synthesis, and challenges
Published Online: Apr 07 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1434
This article will describe the logistics and challenges of solar powered desalination projects through the context of four case studies in locations depicted above that cover these key issues.
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Water, ice, and climate change in northwest Greenland
Published Online: Mar 18 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1433
This is a hunting camp at the ice edge near Qeqertarsuaq, northwest Greenland. Hunters from Qaanaaq have traditionally spent time at the ice edge in spring, but in recent years, the ice has been thinner and slushier, and they talk of how the ice edge has become a place of greater instability, of constant shifts, and the movement and breaking apart of brittle floes, which makes camping and hunting there more difficult and dangerous. Photo: Mark Nuttall.
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The Flint water crisis
Published Online: Mar 12 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1420
The Flint water crisis is one of the most significant environmental contamination events in recent American history, encompassing a variety of water quality and health issues experienced by residents of Flint, Michigan, from April 2014 onward, and raising fundamental questions about water regulation, infrastructure, and environmental justice.
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The role of freshwater bioacoustics in ecological research
Published Online: Feb 12 2020
DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1416
Fish are the focal study species in the majority of freshwater bioacoustic studies, which often focus on a single species that is recorded in laboratory aquaria. Despite their significant contributions to soundscape composition and ecosystem function, arthropods were poorly represented in the research literature. Lentic habitats have also received little research interest, despite their significant ecological value.
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