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WIREs Cogn Sci
Impact Factor: 3.175

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Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews:
Cognitive Science
Volume 10 Issue 6 (November 2019)
Page 0 - 0

Primer

The semantics of questions
Published Online: Jul 26 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1513
Introduction to the semantics of questions.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Advanced Reviews

Self‐control in crows, parrots and nonhuman primates
Published Online: May 20 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1504
Examples of delayed gratification tasks. (a) Exchange task with a corvid: subject can choose to swap a token (e.g., bottle top) for a reward after a delay; (b) Intertemporal choice: monkey can select the immediately available reward or wait for the delayed reward from a rotating tray.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
Theory of mind in animals: Current and future directions
Published Online: May 17 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1503
Forty years of research has sought to determine whether nonhuman animals, like this bonobo, have a theory of mind.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

Focus Articles

Cognitive and motivational selectivity in healthy aging
Published Online: Jun 11 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1512
Selectivity, the ability to prioritize thoughts and actions related to current goals, is both spared and impaired with aging. This review outlines factors that predict age‐related changes in cognitive and motivational selectivity, underlying neural mechanisms, and questions for future research.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF
U‐shaped development in error‐driven child phonology
Published Online: May 31 2019
DOI: 10.1002/wcs.1505
An illustration from Becker and Tessier (2011) of a developmental U‐shape in Trevor's productions of KVT‐type words (e.g., “cat” and “kiss”). Ks and Ts represent the proportion of non‐faithful, harmonic tokens—for example, “cat” produced as “kak” (K) or “tat” (T)—per session; circles in the graph represent the proportion of faithful tokens—for example, “cat” produced as “cat.” The size of each symbol corresponds to the number of faithful or harmonized forms per session.
Abstract Full article on Wiley Online Library:   HTML | PDF

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